2015 Annual Report
25th Anniversary Edition

Read print version here.

President’s message

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Dear Friends,

During 2015 we celebrated EARTH’s 25th anniversary in a series of events that captured our history and set the stage as we look toward the future. For nearly 28 years I have had the distinct privilege of serving as EARTH’s founding president. As I anticipate my retirement at the end of 2016, it is satisfying to look back on all we have achieved since EARTH’s inception and exciting to think about what comes next for the University.

EARTH’s early success is the direct product of several key factors. The first was the vision of the founders who understood that a new model for higher education was necessary to form transformative leaders capable of bringing significant, positive change to eliminate poverty, end hunger, stop violence, and promote peace. EARTH’s founders accepted our strategic, but very risky, proposal of a model that broke from academic tradition. With their support, EARTH developed an integrated curriculum grounded in values, providing opportunities for economically disadvantaged youth -especially those from rural areas- to access a world-class education, and adopting an experiential and student-centered approach to learning and teaching. Thanks to the vision of our founders, EARTH’s model is gaining relevance among other universities and institutions and offers proof that with the right conviction it is possible to cultivate prosperity, justice, and respect for all life.

From the very beginning, a commitment to a shared set of values was instrumental in setting the right tone for the University and for forging a clear path to realizing the mission. All those who became part of EARTH understood the challenges from the start. This identification with EARTH’s mission is what keeps our faculty and staff motivated and attracts new members to our community, including, of course, our students.

Our innovative admissions process has also been key to our success. Our faculty personally interview the young leaders who come to EARTH and develop their competencies and capacities that empower them to improve the conditions of their families, communities, and countries. EARTH students represent a rich diversity of cultures and backgrounds and we make it our priority to ensure that each student receives the attention and resources that she or he needs to be successful.

We have had the incredible privilege of creating something completely new. Every task we met with optimism and enthusiasm, attitudes that continue to characterize the institution today. One of our first projects was to plan and construct the campus. The campus was designed to ensure that the classrooms, laboratories, farms, and residences were all built in line with EARTH’s unique educational approach and environmental commitment. We formed an international faculty and immersed ourselves, as educators trained in distinct disciplines, in nontraditional teaching methods to facilitate student discovery and learning. As new professors join the faculty they too undergo this process. On the commercial side, we transformed our banana farm into an example of sustainability and led dramatic changes in the industry.

I am reminded of many moments and special occasions after all these years, but a few stand out as particularly significant. The first inauguration of classes in 1990 and our first graduation were defining moments for all of us. The Sustainability, Education and the Management of Change in the Tropics (SEMCIT) initiative can now be tied directly to our renown as a model for higher education in agriculture. Our 10th anniversary brought President Gorbachev to campus along with all of Costa Rica’s current and former presidents. Most recently, our nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize is an extraordinary indication of the impact we are having on the world around us.

My time as president is drawing to a close, though EARTH will always be a part of me. There are tremendous opportunities ahead, and the next chapters in the book of EARTH will be as exciting as those already written. The vision for a scientific and technical park at EARTH-La Flor offers tremendous potential for our students and for the region. Graduate programs at EARTH, already underway, capitalize on our unique curriculum and open the door for advanced learning. I am proud of all that has been accomplished at EARTH.

In closing, I offer thanks to all who have invested in EARTH for the difference you have made, and I ask that you continue your support well into the future. We cannot do this without you. To our graduates, each one of you can help transform our planet into one of hope, peace, prosperity and dignity for all. Remember the values upon which EARTH was founded and carry them in your hearts. Each day presents us with the opportunity to advance the EARTH mission. Let us take every chance to continue to realize the EARTH dream.

José Zaglul
President, EARTH University


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

MISSION
Prepare leaders with ethical values to contribute to sustainable development and to construct a prosperous and just society.
VISION
Our actions are mission-driven to alleviate poverty, promote social justice and build a future where our communities achieve sustainable and shared prosperity.

OUR STUDENTS

432 students
from 42 countries

The University is dedicated to providing transformational education to students from rural communities and 70% of our students receive full scholarships for four years. EARTH’s unique admissions process sends faculty to dozens of countries around the world to personally interview and select each candidate. The University maintains an 85% student retention rate, reflecting the supportive environment on campus and the quality of our scholars.

The entering class of 2016 is the first class in EARTH’s history to have more women (56%) than men (44%). This achievement represents an important milestone in reaching gender parity across the entire university, which is currently 46% female overall.

Eighty-five percent of students graduate in four or five years, a highly competitive rate compared to universities worldwide.

432 students  from 42 countries

in the Americas, Africa,
the Caribbean and Europe

in the Americas, Africa, the Caribbean and Europe

STUDENT DISTRUBUTION BY
COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN 2015

432

STUDENTS

46%

WOMEN

42

COUNTRIES


STUDENT DISTRUBUTION BY COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN 2015

OUR GRADUATES

2,034 alumni from 35 countries
in Latin America, the Caribbean,
Africa and Europe.


On December 5, 2015, EARTH graduated its 2,000th alumna: Adriana Murillo (‘15, Colombia)

On December 5, 2015,
EARTH graduated its 2,000th alumna:
Adriana Murillo (‘15, Colombia)

With more than 2000 alumni across the globe, EARTH graduates are generating real and positive results in their communities and nations.
Seventy-five percent of graduates surveyed in 2015 report having a direct and positive impact on the agricultural sector, primarily in increasing agricultural production efficiency, promoting the rational use of agrochemicals and integrated pest management, developing soil nutrition and quality, and conducting projects aimed at mitigating climate change.


Jimene Rábago Aguilar (’09, Mexico)

“The values and knowledge I learned at EARTH motivated me to keep learning more and to always work to achieve the delicate balance between productivity, environmental sustainability and social justice…
Studying at EARTH transformed me into a person who profoundly wants to do things well and also has the tools to do so.”
Jimene Rábago Aguilar (’09, Mexico)


OUR LOCAL COMMUNITIES

June 1992-Present
More than 200,000 people have directly
benefited from CDP´s initiatives

Seventy-nine percent of graduates surveyed report having a direct and positive impact on social issues, such as training farmers, increasing income for rural families, generating employment, improving working conditions and developing projects.

The Community Development Program (CDP) successfully implemented actions in several nearby communities, reaching over 2,800 people last year. Our partnership with the Costa Rica Grameen Association (ACRG) has helped us collaborate with hundreds of rural women in entrepreneurial projects thanks to financing from microloans.

Cañas
Bagaces
Bagatzi
Pijije
Cañas Dulces
Quebrada Grande
La Cruz
El Jobo
Filadelfia
Santa Cruz
Flamingo
Brasilito
Lagunilla
Hojancha

Community Development Program Reach

Community Development Program Reach

Río Jiménez
San Luis
Irlanda
Santa Rosa
La Lucha
EL Hogar
El Edén
África
Parismina
Guácimo
La Argentina
Las Mercedes
Iroquois
Pocora
Luisiana
El Peje
Cairo
La Francia
Germania
El Bosque
San Bosco
Protón Iberia
La Alegría
Villa Franca
Carambola
El Carmen
Villa Real
El Maná
La Isleta
Colinas
Calle Tres
Acasí
La Florita
El Nuevo Amanecer
Porter
Anita Grande
Los Molinos
Las Lomas
El Triunfo
Agrimaga

Over the past year, approximately 20 EARTH students have collaborated with Lidia Hernández Pereira to make technological improvements on her 10-acre farm as part of their work with EARTH’s Community Development Program. Working side by side, they have successfully introduced new crops and improved production, created an organic greenhouse, built a biodigester and started raising freerange chickens. “It’s been so important to have the students’ input. We never stop experimenting and learning. The knowledge they’ve brought me is beautiful.” She goes on to say, “They help me by giving me their time and effort to improve this farm with their technical plans and physical labor. They help me with everything. They’re so brave, these students.”

Over the past year, approximately 20 EARTH students have collaborated with Lidia Hernández Pereira to make technological improvements on her 10-acre farm as part of their work with EARTH’s Community Development Program. Working side by side, they have successfully introduced new crops and improved production, created an organic greenhouse, built a biodigester and started raising freerange chickens.
“It’s been so important to have the students’ input. We never stop experimenting and learning. The knowledge they’ve brought me is beautiful.” She goes on to say, “They help me by giving me their time and effort to improve this farm with their technical plans and physical labor. They help me with everything. They’re so brave, these students.”


ENVIRONMENT

EARTH has a ripple effect on the environment thanks to our graduates working to protect and improve environmental practices around the world and the efforts of our on-campus educational tourism program. Last year, the total number of tourists increased by 30%, with more than 8,400 visitors learning firsthand about our values and philosophy.
In 2015, the Carbon Neutral Unit verified a total of 19 new organizations and maintained the verification of carbon neutrality in nine previously verified organizations.
More than 1,000 people were trained by the Environmental Action Unit to create greater awareness for environmental issues in the area.
The amount of recovered waste gathered for recycling and sales increased from 56 to 57 tons in 2015, with 47 tons of recoverable waste and 10 tons of compost.
Seventy-nine percent of EARTH graduates surveyed in 2015 report having a direct and positive impact on environmental issues, such as soil and water conservation, biodiversity and wildlife conservation, waste management and climate change mitigation and adaptation.
International recognition for renewable energies efforts

The German Ministry of the Environment, Nature Protection and Nuclear Safety listed the Center for Research and Development in Renewable Energies (CIDER) in its 2008-2014 work report as one of its worldwide exemplary projects, stressing the importance of international cooperation for the resolution of global problems.

The REN@EARTH Project and CIDERThe REN@EARTH Project and CIDER were presented as one of the “21 good practices for sustainable low carbon development in developing countries” as part of the study “Exploring Sustainable Low Carbon Development Pathways”, published by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation, WWF, Actalliance, Climate Action Network, and Brot für die Welt. The examples presented in this publication are considered worldwide pioneers of change.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

EARTH is the only university in the world that requires all of its students to develop, run and close a real business venture during their undergraduate program, an approach that has proven to inspire an entrepreneurial spirit in our graduates.

Seventy-six percent of EARTH graduates surveyed in 2015 report having a direct and positive impact on the business sector, primarily in:

47%

Effective management practices, increased profitability

41%

Diversification of activities

35%

Development of new projects

29%

Development of innovative ventures

28%

Contributing tothe value chain

Twenty percent of our graduates run their own or family business. Of those, 80% have created new jobs through their enterprise.

“EARTH has been the best decision of my life. Being here helped me become an entrepreneur, be more proactive and take initiative. I’ve traveled to other countries, thanks to the artisanal crafts I make. All the goals I set for myself, I’ve accomplished. The University changed my life, and I know in the future I will make changes in my rural area. I’ve had so much support and I know that I will fight for progress in my region.” Sindy Ramos  (’16, Guatemala)

“EARTH has been the best decision of my life. Being here helped me become an entrepreneur, be more proactive and take initiative. I’ve traveled to other countries, thanks to the artisanal crafts I make.
All the goals I set for myself, I’ve accomplished. The University changed my life, and I know in the future I will make changes in my rural area.
I’ve had so much support and I know that I will fight for progress in my region.”

Sindy Ramos (’16, Guatemala)

1984
1984 - A group of Costa Rican visionaries partnered with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Costa Rican Government to establish EARTH University.

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A group of Costa Rican visionaries partnered with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Costa Rican Government to establish EARTH University.

1989
Construction of the University begins. Appointment of first University President,  José Zaglul.

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Construction of the University begins.
Appointment of first University President,
José Zaglul.

1990
On March 26, EARTH inaugurates its first class with 60 students.

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On March 26, EARTH inaugurates its first class with 60 students.

1993
EARTH graduates its first class of professionals in Agriculture Sciences and Natural Resource Management.

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EARTH graduates its first class of professionals in Agriculture Sciences and Natural Resource Management.

2004
Oduber Elliot family donates La Flor Farm in the dry tropics of Guanacaste to EARTH University.

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Oduber Elliot family donates La Flor Farm in the dry tropics of Guanacaste to EARTH University.

2007
EARTH University is declared the first carbon-neutral campus in Costa Rica.

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EARTH University is declared the first carbon-neutral campus in Costa Rica.

2012
April 26th, 2012, EARTH partners with The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program, greatly expanding our capacity to identify, interview and admit African students.

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April 26th, 2012, EARTH partners with The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program, greatly expanding our capacity to identify, interview and admit African students.

2015
EARTH celebrates its 2,000th graduate and 25th Anniversary as an institution dedicated to creating leaders of change.

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EARTH celebrates its 2,000th graduate and 25th Anniversary as an institution dedicated to creating leaders of change.


25 YEARS PREPARING LEADERS OF CHANGE

21990-1994

Pioneer graduate Edilberto Romero (‘93, Belize) was one of the first students who dared to believe in the dream of EARTH over 20 years ago. He is now the Executive Director of Programme for Belize, an NGO focused on promoting biodiversity and conservation in an area of approximately 260,000 acres. He manages several projects that are dedicated to biodiversity conservation, sustainable community-led development and agroforestry practices to help farmers improve their yields, increase revenues and reduce deforestation. His work is vital to ensuring the continued protection of forests and sustainable use of natural resources in the area.

Edilberto Romero (‘93, Belize)

Edilberto Romero (‘93, Belize)

“EARTH opened up a path for us where we learned theory in addition to practical skills. I learned to value the knowledge of the communities, and I can say that working in the community opens up your heart and helps you to see life differently. Also, the classes that were focused on protecting the environment showed me another aspect of agriculture, which led me to complete a master’s degree in Natural Resources Economy. Today, my job is centered on production, conservation and sustainable development—and it all started at EARTH.”

1995-2000

Julio César Santin (’98, Brazil) has dedicated his career to promoting sustainable practices among small-scale, rural farmers, focusing primarily on forestry management to generate income
streams and restore forests. Today, he leads four silviculture technology development teams for a project with the government-owned Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA), and is responsible for coordinating technical assistance for all of the silviculture plantations in the region.

In addition, he works as a technical consultant for the Amazon Without Fire Project, a multinational initiative financed by the Brazilian Government, Italian Cooperation Agency, and the Development Bank of Latin America. Julio is also a university professor and teaches a course on technology in agribusiness.

Julio César Santin (’98, Brazil)

Julio César Santin (’98, Brazil)

“The professional and personal preparation that EARTH gave me has opened practically every door that I have been able to enter during my adult life. I believe that if everyone does their part we can achieve more sustainable production systems, which produce food to sustain us while preserving the environment for future generations. Every day in my work I try to plant a small seed, as I am sure that many of them will germinate and later produce good fruit.”

2000-2004

After graduating, Mayra Ruiz (’00, Colombia) returned to San Juan de Rio Seco, where she and her family run a coffee company called El Tabor. Mayra has also worked for the Colombian Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism since 2010, leading a high-quality coffee exportation project sourced from small producers in 12 municipalities and two Nasa Wex indigenous reserves. The farmers sell to upscale coffee markets in the US and Japan, and Mayra helps them to better compete in a globalized economy that hinges on client satisfaction. Her work has had a ripple effect among the community: producers have more crop security and increased income for their families, young people see a future in farming and are less likely to migrate to the city, and locals are trained as expert coffee tasters and baristas.

Mayra Ruiz (’00, Colombia)

Mayra Ruiz (’00, Colombia)

“If I hadn’t studied at EARTH, I definitely would not have the business vision that I have today, nor the comprehensive training to act as an agent of change. I feel that I have a responsibility to make change, not necessarily that I need to do it myself, but rather inspire a transformation that can generate economic growth and transform people’s lives so that people do not feel the need to belong to gangs. I want people to work with pride, make money and help others.”

2005-2009

In September 2013, the New York Times reported that the Honduran government had awarded title of nearly 3,000 square miles in eastern Honduras to the indigenous Miskito people. At the forefront of this historic achievement was Norvin Goff Salinas (’06, Honduras) who currently represents more than 100,000 people as elected president of the Coalition of Indigenous Groups of La Mosquitia (MASTA). In mid-2015, Norvin and the Miskito community celebrated another victory when they were granted another 3,000 square miles of territory in the Río Plátano biosphere reserve, an endangered UNESCO World Heritage site. Under Norvin’s leadership MASTA has also worked to improve access to social benefits for more than 5,000 low-income families, and its economic development programs have directly benefited 12,000 families. In recognition of their contributions to sustainable development, MASTA was awarded the 2015 Equator Prize by the United Nation Development Program.

Norvin Goff Salinas (’06, Honduras)

Norvin Goff Salinas (’06, Honduras)

“The diversity of teaching that EARTH students receive promotes a desire to engage yourself in today’s society. This is a great strength of the University: that it isn’t just about agronomy, but also about the community. For us, the acknowledgement of our land rights has inspired us to continue working for those most in-need, and to promote sustainable development that is just and with a community economy that ensures equity.”

2010-2015

Lynhe Demesyeux (’13, Haiti)

Lynhe Demesyeux (’13, Haiti)

After graduation, Lynhe Demesyeux (’13, Haiti) started a professional internship at the IF Foundation and was later offered a full time position there. She worked as Co-Coordinator of the SRI (System of Rice Intensification) project, responsible for all scientific experiments at the organization. In 2015, she began working at SMASH (Smallholders Alliance for Sorghum in Haiti/Papyrus) working with small-scale sorghum farmers to increase their production with access training in modern sustainable practices, high-quality seeds and assessment by trained agronomists. Recently, Lynhe was promoted to Regional Manager for the Northeast department and supervises four other agronomists; together they work directly with more than 1,000 farmers. Lynhe also manages a research project that evaluates the properties of sorghum varieties, with the goal of defining which ones are optimal for the region.

“I think what makes EARTH graduates different are the values and the passion we have to work together with communities, understand what they need and really make a change. Because I had experience working with communities at EARTH and during my internship, I felt really good when I started here. Although the realities of farmers in Costa Rica might be different then they are here, you can apply the same knowledge and learning.”

25 YEARS ILUMINATING LIVES

W.K. Kellogg FoundationGuided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation works with communities to create conditions that propel vulnerable children, so they can realize their full potential in school, work and life. The Kellogg Foundation understands the critical role education plays in development, and Mr. Kellogg himself noted that “education is the best way for truly improving one generation over another.” In 1984, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation generously funded the feasibility study that made EARTH University a reality. More than 30 years later, the Foundation has provided scholarship support to hundreds of young leaders at EARTH.

The MasterCard FoundationThe MasterCard Foundation seeks a world where everyone has the opportunity to learn and prosper. All people, no matter their starting point in life, should have an equal chance to succeed. The Foundation focuses on helping economically disadvantaged young people in Africa and Latin America find opportunities to move themselves, their families and their communities out of poverty to a better life. The partnership between EARTH and The MasterCard Foundation’s Scholarship Program has allowed hundreds of students worldwide who may not otherwise attend college have the opportunity to study at EARTH.

CumminsSince the company’s inception in 1919, Cummins has invested talent, passion, and resources into trying to solve problems in our communities and society as a whole. Cummins firmly believes a company is only as healthy as the communities where it does business. As one of the first corporate foundations, the Cummins Foundation was created in 1954 and has served global communities. A former Cummins Executive on loan to EARTH stated, “More so than any other effort in which we are involved, EARTH’s mission cuts across all our corporate responsibility priorities at Cummins.” With the support of their Foundation, EARTH now has its first endowed professorship as well as many endowed Cummins scholarships.

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) had been working in the region for decades when the concept of EARTH was proposed. With strong support from the Costa Rican Government, USAID approved their largest commitment in their more than 30 year presence in the country to help establish EARTH University. Today, EARTH remains one of USAID’s most important legacies in Costa Rica. This partnership continues through the support provided by American Schools and Hospital’s Abroad (ASHA). Investments by USAID/ASHA have been critical for expanding and maintaining the University’s infrastructure, and have enabled the institution to dedicate more resources to providing scholarship to deserving students.

Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD)Recognizing the importance of higher education in poverty alleviation, in 1996, the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) began a long-term partnership with EARTH University to promote economic prosperity and social well-being in Central America. In this time, Norway has provided scholarships for students primarily from Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala.

Two years after the start of the relationship with NORAD, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) also began a long-term partnership with EARTH providing scholarships to students, primarily from the same three Central American countries. Together, NORAD and SIDA have supported hundreds of scholars within Central America.

EARTH University

George and Clare Todd | Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA First visited EARTH in 1993

George and Clare Todd | Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA First visited EARTH in 1993

George and Clare Todd | Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA First visited EARTH in 1993

Shortly after his first visit to EARTH, George Todd began hosting EARTH interns at his family-owned business, Kalsec. Interest in EARTH grew into a family passion, and twentythree years later, George reflected on what stood out the most about the University. “One of the things we have seen is that a lot of these kids do turn into leaders. Many are back in their home countries making a real difference in the quality of life and quality of government, and they’re having an impact on the environment. I just received an email from a former intern, Daniel Ortega, and he was just named Minister of the Environment in Ecuador…My hope is that I’m around for another 23 years of wonderful interns.”

Jean Blackwell and Kim Williams Indianapolis, Indiana, USA First visited EARTH together in 2007

Jean Blackwell and Kim Williams Indianapolis, Indiana, USA First visited EARTH together in 2007

Jean Blackwell and Kim Williams
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
First visited EARTH together in 2007

“EARTH is one of the few places that provides an intersection for our interests. Kim is very passionate about organic gardening, food safety and sustainability, and I am passionate about education and global development, particularly in emerging economies. EARTH is where we get the best of both worlds and something that feeds both of our passions.” EARTH’s next 25 years: Looking forward to the journey!

Jeannie Wright Atlanta, Georgia, USA First visited EARTH in 2003

Jeannie Wright Atlanta, Georgia, USA First visited EARTH in 2003

Jeannie Wright Atlanta, Georgia, USA First visited EARTH in 2003

“I have gained so much from my bird-watching travels in Latin America. Supporting EARTH felt like a fabulous way to give back to the communities by providing an education to someone who would never have had the opportunity otherwise. The High Andes of Peru is one of my favorite places for birding and also one of the poorest areas in Latin America; thus, I have chosen to sponsor students from that region”

Advice to others: Go to campus and see for yourselves

Anna Maria Oduber Daughter of the late Marjorie Elliott de Oduber and Daniel Oduber Quirós, former President of Costa Rica

Anna Maria Oduber Daughter of the late Marjorie Elliott de Oduber and Daniel Oduber Quirós, former President of Costa Rica

Anna Maria Oduber Daughter of the late Marjorie Elliott de Oduber and Daniel Oduber Quirós, former President of Costa Rica

EARTH-La Flor was established thanks to the great generosity of the Oduber Family in 2004. Anna Maria remembers visiting EARTH with her late mother, Marjorie, at an early age and how meaningful those visits were. “Everything that develops at EARTH is extremely inspiring; as soon as you enter and begin to speak with professors and students, you feel a contagious positive energy.” Anna Maria was recently able to take her own young daughters to visit La Flor for the first time last year. “We visited the experimental house where they maintain renewable energy alternatives. We were impressed with EARTH’s capacity to develop environmental learning programs and, with the implementation of these topics on campus, such as solar and wind energy as well as sustainable agriculture.”

As EARTH celebrated its 25th Anniversary, there were numerous examples of the positive impact of our investments. Thousands of new pathways exist in the world today through the work of our graduates. Each pathway has been illuminated by generous supporters around the world. A special thank you to those Illuminators who have made transformational gifts of one million dollars or more in EARTH’s first 25 years.

Anonymous (1)

A.G. Leventis Foundation

Agencia Española de Cooperación

Internacional- CR

The ALIA Group

Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID-Fondo Japón)

Jane and Dameron Black III

The Cummins Foundation

Fideicomiso Elliot Oduber

Instituto para la Formación y Aprovechamiento de Recursos Humanos (IFARHU)

Katherine John Murphy Foundation

The MasterCard Foundation

Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas, Panamá

Moore Family Foundation

Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation

Karin and Mark Ohrstrom

Open Society Foundations

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency

SENESCYT (Globo Común Ecuador)

Denny† and Tim Solso

U.S. Department of Energy

USAID-ASHA

W. K. Kellogg Foundation

Wege Foundation

Whole Foods Market

“By supporting our strongly held ideals, we shine light upon the world, and guide not just EARTH or its students, but humanity as a whole towards a more caring, equitable and peaceful future.”

Jane Cocke Black, Founder, EARTH University Foundation


ECOin 2015

ECOin 2015

ECOin (Intergenerational Environmental Stewardship Conference) was held at EARTH University’s campus from November 5-6, 2015. The conference sought to unite generations with the common goal of creating innovative solutions to combat the effects of climate change and advance global sustainable development as a shared responsibility between the generation of young leaders and adult generation leaders represented by existing policyholders, world leaders and opinion makers. Over 600 people participated, including President Luis Guillermo Solís and First Lady Mercedes Peñas, Rebecca Grynspan, David Ives, Cristiana Figueres, Franklin Chang Diaz, finalists from the 2014 Greenovators competition, EARTH faculty, students and alumni and more. The event culminated with the signing of a document that was officially submitted to the COP 21 Climate Change Agreement in Paris.

President Luis Guillermo Solís and David IvesJosé Zaglul and First Lady Mercedes PeñasRebecca Grynspan and Cristiana Figueres

Internship Sponsors

The trust and partnership we receive from our internship sponsors across the globe makes it possible for every third year EARTH student to gain invaluable work and life experience through a 15-week professional internship in the field of their choice.

ADITMAQ, Ecuador

Advanta Semillas SAIC, Argentina

Agrícola Las Cruzadas, Chile

Agrícola y Agropecuaria Kong, Ecuador

Agropecuaria Punta Riel S.A., Paraguay

Alexandre Family EcoDairy Farms, CA, USA

Alia2 S.A., Ecuador

Alimentos Sanos
de Yucatán,
Mexico

Aquaponic Research Center, Bahamas

Arysta Life Science
(Agrifocus),
Mozambique

Asociación de Apicultores
de San Pedro de Vilcabamba,
Ecuador

Aurora Organic Dairy, CO, USA

Avian Technology International LLC,
GA,
USA

Bioversity International, Ethiopia

Bland Farms, GA, USA

Camp Twin Lakes, GA, USA

Camposol S.A., Peru

Cape Eleuthera Institute, Bahamas

Carolina for Kibera, Kenya

Central Agricultural
Research Institute (CARI),
Liberia

Centro de Estudio Postcosecha (CEPOC),
Universidad de Chile,
Chile

Centro Internacional de
Agricultura Tropical (CIAT),
Colombia

CORBANA S.A., Costa Rica

Corporación Favorita C.A., Ecuador

Costa Nursery Farms, Inc.,
Dominican Republic

Counisa (Allegro Coffee), Guatemala

Cummins Ghana Limited, Ghana

Cummins South Africa, South Africa

Earth Island – Follow your Heart, CA, USA

ECO – TOP Consult, Bolivia

ECOM Agroindustrial, Tanzania

Extractora Quevepalma S.A.,Ecuador

Finca Montefrío, Spain

FOKAL, Haiti

Frieda’s, Inc., CA, USA

Fundación Co. Honducafe, Honduras

Galápagos Flores, Ecuador

Grupo Citrofrut, Mexico

Hacienda Cacaotera
Jesús María,
Mexico

Hacienda La Esmeralda S.A., Panama

Hotel Jardines del Lago, Guatemala

IDV Árbol, Peru

Instituto Interamericano de
Cooperación para la Agricultura
(IICA),
Ecuador

Inter-American Institute for
Cooperation on Agriculture
(IICA),
Bahamas

International Institute of
Tropical Agriculture (IITA),
Uganda

International Livestock
Research Institute (ILRI),
Uganda

Iowa State University, IA, USA

JPG Resources, MI, USA

K & K Pflanzen, Germany

Kalsec Inc., MI, USA

Kenya Red Cross Society, Kenya

Kibbutz Kalia, Israel

La Quinta de Sarapiquí Lodge, Costa Rica

Leventis Foundation Nigeria, Nigeria

MERCON S.A., Nicaragua

Minimex Ltd., Rwanda

Natural Pact, Costa Rica

North Dakota State
University, ND,
USA

Oleoflores S.A., Colombia

Orchard Africa, South Africa

PrimusLabs, Costa Rica

Rwanda Girls
Initiative Farm,
Rwanda

SEKEM, Egypt

Selva Negra Eco Lodge,
Nicaragua

Semen Pork Genética, Ecuador

Sisapamba Rosas & Rosas, Ecuador

SMASH/Papyrus, Haiti

Sociedad Agrícola e
Industrial San Carlos S.A.,
Ecuador

Sociedad Manríquez e
Hijos y Compañía Ltd.,
Chile

Soldive, Senegal

Sustainable Harvest
International,
Belize

Sustainable Harvest
International,
Panama

Tabafresh S.A. de C.V., Mexico

Taller Nuevos Territorios, Colombia

Tenuta Vannulo Organic Farm, Italy

Thuso Social
Service Foundation,
South Africa

Unión Regional de Pequeños
Productores de Café Huatusco,
Mexico

Universidad Politécnica Salesiana-
Centro de Investigación de la Leche (CILEC),
Ecuador

University of Florida, Everglades
Research and Education Center, FL,
USA

University of Florida, FL, USA

University of Florida,
Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative, FL,
USA

University of Florida,
Tropical Research and Education Center, FL,
USA

University of Georgia, GA, USA

University of Missouri, MO, USA

University of São Paulo, Brazil

USAID – Food and Enterprise
Development Program for Liberia,
Liberia

Volcafe, Costa Rica

Zanmi Lasante / Zanmi Agrikol, Haiti


Our Faculty

EARTH’s talented and diverse faculty members are responsible for creating a participatory and experiential learning environment that provides students with the resources and experiences necessary for their academic, personal and professional growth.

OUR FACULTY

OUR FACULTY

OUR FACULTYJunior Acosta, MSc., Costa Rica
Edgar Alvarado, MSc., Guatemala
Irene Alvarado, Ph.D., Costa Rica
Jorge Arce, MSc., Costa Rica
Alejandra Arroyo, Ph.D., Argentina
Steven Brenes, MSc., Costa Rica
Udi Mandel Butler, Ph.D., England/Brazil
Sergio Callau, Ph.D., Spain
Elmer Cantarero, MBA, Honduras
Róger Castellón, MSc., Costa Rica
Manuel Cerrato, Ph.D., Honduras
Yanine Chan, Ph.D., Costa Rica
Carlos Demerutis, MSc., Mexico
Nico Evers, MSc., Netherlands
Rebeca García, M.Sc., Spain
Alex Gilman, Ph.D., England
Tobías Gómez, MSc., Costa Rica
Bert Kohlmann, Ph.D., Mexico
Jeremy Lackman, Ph.D., USA
Humberto Leblanc, Ph.D., Panama
Rafael Marzall do Amaral, MSc., Brazil
Julieta Mazzola, MSc., Argentina
Kent McLeod, Ph.D., USA
Nichole McVeigh, M.A., USA
José Cristino Melgar, Ph.D., Honduras
Argenis Mora, Ph.D., Venezuela
Marvin Mora, MSc., Costa Rica
Víctor Hugo Morales, MSc., Venezuela
Gopu Nair, Ph.D., India
Walter Ndonkeu Tita, Ph.D., Canada/Cameroon
Alex Pacheco, Ph.D., Colombia
Irmino Perera, M.A., Cuba
Johan Perret, Ph.D., France
Mario Piedra, Ph.D., Costa Rica
Luis Ernesto Pocasangre, Ph.D., Honduras
Amy Porter, MSc., USA
Jorge Celso Rodríguez, MSc., Peru
B.K. Singh, Ph.D., Nepal
Ana Cristina Tamayo, Ph.D., Colombia
Roque Vaquero, MSc., Honduras


EARTH – LA FLOR

The EARTH-La Flor campus, located near the city of Liberia, Guanacaste, has created and fostered an active presence of the University in the region, instilling a mark of EARTH’s educational approach in more than 24 communities. Both private and public organizations have benefitted from the activities and many small and medium sized entrepreneurs, community organizations, schools, and groups have also reaped the benefits of the student and faculty involvement.

NEW RESEARCH INITIATIVES

EARTH - LA FlorConcerned for the drought-stricken region as a result of the effects of El Niño and climate change, EARTH has actively sought and generated opportunities to work with local cattle producers with their challenges, starting with animal nutrition, food availability as well as improving the quality of traditionally available foodstuffs.

Plans are in motion to build the Center for Excellence in Precision Agriculture – a joint initiative with EARTH-La Flor and NASA-JPL in Los Angeles, California. With the creation of the Center, EARTH and NASA hope to create more jobs in the sector, promote efficient use of resources in agriculture throughout Guanacaste, and help the region adapt their production practices to the increasingly dry climate, which has already had a negative effect on farmers and ranchers.

Starting in the second half of 2015, EARTH-La Flor began researching climate change adaptation, focusing our efforts on mango, forage, hay and silage production. Our strategy is to develop new ways to manage mango plantation renovations, insect pests, nutrition, and water management.


CONTRIBUTING TO THE COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTING TO THE COMMUNITY

Third and fourth year students are spending important time of their academic years at La Flor, learning, experiencing and assisting the campus with inventories, assessments, and project designs that are targeting
its sustainability. Some include: water, crops and new approaches in animal production. They also are exposed to many of the industries and agribusiness ventures in the region, and their challenges and strategies, all of which help them to be better prepared for their professional life.


EARTH UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION

Statement of Financial Position
as of December 31, 2015

ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents $ 2,408,827
Prepaid expenses, deposits and other receivables $ 39,512
Receivable from EARTH $ 153,712
Pledge receivable, net $ 6,414,493
Endowment pledges receivable, net $ 2,807,812
Endowment and other investments $ 22,141,662
Cash surrender value of life insurance $ 332,051
Property and equipment, net $ 53,836
$ 34,351,905
LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued expenses $ 74,022
Advance from EARTH $ 100,000
Scholarships payable to EARTH $ 100,541
Payable to EARTH Trust $ 35,719
$ 310,282
Net assets
Unrestricted
Board designated for endowment $ 175,000
Available for operations $ 2,075,653
$ 2,250,653
Temporarily restricted $ 7,538,272
Permanently restricted $ 24,252,698
$ 34,041,623
$ 34,351,905
STATEMENT OF FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES
Year End December 31, 2015
ASSETS Programs Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses
Salaries and benefits $ 507,835 $ 196,440 $ 444,257 $ 1,148,532
Consulting $ 5,446 $ 12,299 $ 57,637 $ 75,382
Professional services $ 6,545 $ 43,143 $ 6,607 $ 56,295
Office expenses $ 48,807 $ 82,501 $ 70,969 $ 202,277
Travel and board meetings $ 4,635 $ 85,270 $ 84,067 $ 173,972
Scholarships $ 2,339,935 - - $ 2,339,935
Project and program expense $ 2,443,849 $ 15,639 - $ 2,459,488
TOTAL $ 5,357,052 $ 435,292 $ 663,537 $ 6,455,881
EARTH University Operational Budget 2015 Financial Results

(In thousands of dollars)
INCOME
Tuition payments and scholarship $9,123.8
Other income (special projects, commercial activities, other donations) $3,470.1
EARTH Endowment $6,648.8
TOTAL: $19,242.70
EXPENSES
Compensation and benefits for administrative and operational $6,353.7
Compensation and benefits for faculty and senior administrative staff $4,626.7
Operational Expenses $5,744.6
Equipment investment and replacement $500.0
Contingencies $43.4
Fundraising $1,974.3
TOTAL: $19,242.70

*University Operations Budget for 2015 was $ 17.3 million plus an investment of additional $1.7 million in fundraising, for a total 2015 expense budget of $19.2 million.

OUR FINANCES

HOW WE ALLOCATE OUR OPERATIONAL RESOURCES

HOW WE ALLOCATE OUR OPERATIONAL RESOURCES

HOW OUR BUDGET IS FINANCED

HOW OUR BUDGET IS FINANCED

OUR DONORS

We recognize and appreciate the generous support of the following donors whose gifts were received from January 1- December 31, 2015. These individuals, businesses, foundations, governments and international organizations make the continued fulfillment of our mission possible.


Italics= Multi-year Commitment | *= EARTH Supporter for 5+ Consecutive Years | **= EARTH Supporter for 10+ Consecutive Years | ***= EARTH Supporter for 15+ Consecutive Years | ****= EARTH Supporter for 20+ Consecutive Years

$10,000,000+

The MasterCard Foundation*

$5,000,000 - 9,999,999


SENESCYT (Globo Común Ecuador)*

$1,000,000 - 4,999,999


A.G. Leventis Foundation*
BAC San José****
The Cummins Foundation*
IFARHU**
W. K. Kellogg Foundation****
Katherine John Murphy Foundation****
Karin and Mark Ohrstrom***
Open Society Foundations*
Denny† and Tim Solso**
USAID-ASHA**

$250,000 - 999,999

Alcaldía de Machala
Anne Bass
Howard G. Buffett Foundation
Corrugados del Atlántico***
Donante Anónimo Costa Rica**
Alan Kelso Machado***
Karen and Robert Kustel**
Betty and Whitney MacMillan*
Fideicomiso Elliot Oduber
Sally and Ken Ohrstrom*
Fundación Simón I. Patiño***
Fundación Porticus Latin America*
Scotiabank***
Wege Foundation**
WEM Foundation*
Whole Foods Market***

$100,000 - 249,999

Anonymous (1)
Samantha Bass
The BOMA Project*
Marisa and Mark Brenninkmeyer
The Butler Foundation*
Barbara Butler and Jeffrey Bendis*
Kathleen and Doug Colson**
The Edward Colston Foundation Inc.
Corporación Automercado**
Dentons LLP
Barbara and Ivor Freeman**
Fundación Poligrow
Dianne and Ron Hoge**
Ingenio Taboga S.A.
Gerald A. and Karen A. Kolschowsky Foundation, Inc.**
Karen and Gerald Kolschowsky**
Mammel Foundation
Catherine and Mark McGahan
Linda and William McQuillan
Adrienne Meisel and Rand Sparling
Ministerio de Educación de Belice*
Virginia and Edward Mitchell, Jr.*
Moore Family Foundation*
Kathleen Justice-Moore and Steven Moore*
The Ohrstrom Foundation, Inc.
George L. Ohrstrom Jr. Foundation
Charles R. O’Malley Charitable Lead Trust
Panasonic Corporation of North America
Kirstie Timar
Linda and Richard Tsoumas
Volcafé Costa Rica*

$50,000 - 99,999


Americana Foundation**
Elyse and Joshua Arnow*
Bland Farms
Sandra and Delbert Bland
Lynn Hoffman-Brouse and Mark S. Brouse*
Norma Buchman
The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation
Francis Durman
Grupo Duwest
Hoffman-Brouse Foundation*
Mary and James Moog***
The Trio Foundation of St. Louis***

$25,000-49,999


Diane and Kent Alexander*
Hon. Anne Slaughter Andrew and Joe Andrew
Claire Lewis Arnold and H. Ross Arnold III***
Christine and Herbert Fluharty
Frieda’s, Inc.*
Fundación Enlasa
The Isaf Family Foundation, Inc.
Therus Kolff*
Morvest Business Group
Bobby and Pat Moser
Clare and George Todd****
Rebecca Wood*
Jeannie Wright

$15,000 - 24,999


Anonymous (3)
Briarwood Farm Foundation
Sylvia de Leon and Lynn Coleman
Cynthia and Stephen Isaf
Kalsec, Inc.****
Gertrude and William C. Wardlaw Fund

$10,000 - 14,999


Micki and Michael Besancon*
Francine Fleming
Journey Charitable Foundation
Carlos Enrique González Pinto
Carol and David Lindenbaum
Briana and Josh Lindenbaum
Schnieders Family Foundation*
The Solstice Foundation, Inc.

$5,000 - 9,999


Anonymous (1)
Accenture Costa Rica
Ray C. Anderson Foundation
Tilawa Agro
José Ricardo Barcia Jarre
Kevin Barcia Jarre
Shirley and Clifford Bowser
Maureen and John Bridgeland
Marilyn and Allan Brown*
Alison and G. Richard Fletcher**
Follow Your Heart
Pamela and Rick Foster*
Frey Foundation*
Laura Frey*
Duvall and J. Rex Fuqua
Jessie Harris and George
Cunningham**
Christine and Jon Hoek*
Realan Foundation, Inc.
Rockdale Foundation
Sharon and Thomas Sherrard
Sykes Costa Rica
Transplace

$1,000 - 4,999


Airwatch
James Black
Mandy Black
Kathleen S. Brooks Family Foundation,
Inc.
Caplin Foundation
Michael Caplin**
Diane and Richard Clark**
ConocoPhillips
Corporación Inmobiliaria La Cabaña S.A.
Mary and Mahlon DeLong, MD
Kitty and Kurt Diefenbach
Elizabeth Dietel and Michael Sands*
Linda and William Dietel*
Dorfman-Pacific Company, Inc.
James Duncan, Jr.
Wendy Druce and Hugh Durden*
EarthShare
Janet Eastridge**
Kevan Fight
Marlene Fluharty
Elma Goduto and Tim Conlon
Jane Lipman and Bob Goodman
Goodman-Lipman Family Foundation
Diana Gray
Helene Harding and Dr. Patrick
Briggs*
Mary E. Haverty Foundation, Inc.
Nan and Rawson Haverty, Jr.
Bobbo Jetmundsen
Julia Jitkoff
Gina and Rich Kelley*
Ann Kerr-Adams and Ken Adams***
Jacquelyn and Timothy Kolschowsky
L’Aiglon Foundation
Louise and David Lutton*
Maurer Publishing, LLC
Mary and Wesley Maurer
Tracy Meetre
Virginia and Hartley Neel
Sharon Pauli
Mauree Jane and Mark Perry
Jennifer Potter Winton and John
Winton
María José Retana Gamboa
Hannah Rusch
Faith Vruggink and Victor Sanchez**
Jeanine and Guy Saperstein
Seevers Family Foundation
Eiko and Gary Seevers
Wendy Judy and Daniel Sherrard*
John Short
Cary and Jack Sibley*
Tim Statler****
Steven Tanksley*
Randal Teague, Esq.*
Tull Charitable Foundation, Inc.
Amy and Andrew Vaughn*
Diane and B. Philip Winder
Margaret and Terry Wittenberg*
Thomas Wood
Randi S.N. Yoder and Michael J.
Henley*

The Impact of Your Gift in 2015

56% FULL GENDER PARITY IN THE UNIVERSITY.

For the first time in history, female students make up of an entire class – an important goal of reaching

56%
FULL GENDER PARITY IN THE UNIVERSITY.

9 out of 10 EARTH students
9 out of 10 EARTH studentsare from rural communities,
an important part of
our poverty reduction
strategy, as
75%
of the developing world’s
poor live in rural areas.

By graduation day, every EARTH student will have completed
more than 2,300 hours of:

Field Experience
Internships
Research
Community Development
Entrepreneurial Projects
Leadership Training
2,000 aspiring students in 49 nations,

In 2015, EARTH received a record number of applications from nearly 2,000
aspiring students in 49 nations, a reflection of our growing
international presence.

Today, we have
students from
42
countries
in the Americas, Africa,
the Caribbean and Europe – a
remarkable increase from just
seven nations in 1990.
4 out of 5 alumni

are going back and
giving back to their
home countries in meaninful,
measurable ways.

mapa

7,000 educators, interns, students, visitors and professionals

Each year, more than
7,000 educators, interns, students, visitors and professionals
around the world visit EARTH to learn about our work.

92% of all students92%

of all students are awarded
need based financial aid,
with most receiving full scholarships.

Thank you
gift
For all that you do for EARTH
your support makes it possible for
us to prepare the leaders of change
that the world needs most.


OUR BOARDS AND SENIOR LEADERSHIP

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Tim Solso, President, IN, US
Alan Kelso, Vice President, Costa Rica
Pedro León, Secretary, Costa Rica
Ana Regina Aguirre de Riojas, Guatemala
Abdallah Alaoui, Morocco
Anne Slaughter Andrew, MD, USA
Marisa Brenninkmeyer, UK
Franklin Chang-Díaz, Costa Rica
Francis Durman, Costa Rica
Carlos Enrique González Pinto, Costa Rica
Olav Kjorven, Norway
Randal Teague, VA, USA

EMERITI DIRECTORS

Isabel Abreu, Dominican Republic
Salvador Alemañy, Puerto Rico
†Rodolfo Cortes R., Costa Rica
†Jorge Manuel Dengo O., Costa Rica
†Hernán Fonseca, Costa Rica
†Eduardo King Carr, Brazil
Luis Alberto Monge Álvarez, Costa Rica
†José Elias Sanchez, Honduras
†Glen Taggart, USA

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Randal Teague, President, VA, USA
Randi Yoder, Vice President, MN, USA
G. Richard Fletcher, Treasurer, CA, USA
Mark Ohrstrom, VA, USA
Tim Solso, IN, USA

EMERITUS TRUSTEE

†Norman A. Brown, USA

EARTH UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Mark Ohrstrom, President, VA, USA
Therus Kolff, Treasurer, UT, USA
Kent Alexander, GA, USA
Ross Arnold, GA, USA
Joshua Arnow, NY, USA
Michael Besancon, CA, USA
Jane Black, GA, USA
Mark S. Brouse, UT, USA
Kathleen Colson, VT, USA
Ian Davidson, UK
Sylvia de Leon, DC, USA
Lynn Hoffman-Brouse, UT, USA
Ronald Hoge, CA, USA
Alan Kelso, Costa Rica
Gustavo Manrique, ‘96, Ecuador
Mark McGahan, GA, USA
Adrienne Meisel, IL, USA
Tim Solso, IN, USA
Randi Yoder, MN, USA

PRESIDENT’S ADVISORY BOARD

John Bridgeland, President, VA, USA
Ashleigh Black, SC, USA
Jane Black, GA, USA
Carlos Gustavo Cano, Colombia
Ernesto Castegnaro, Costa Rica
Rick Foster, MI, USA
Elke Hawila, UK
Abdulsalam Haykal, Syria
Whitney MacMillan, MN, USA
Malcolm W. Wilson, CO, USA
Ann Kerr-Adams, CA, USA

PRESIDENT’S YOUNG ADVISORY BOARD

Edward Brenninkmeyer, President, Brazil
Coco Brenninkmeyer, UK
Caily Bridgeland, VA, USA
Fallon Bridgeland, VA, USA
José Mauricio Cano, Colombia
Olli Coupe, Australia
William Dunn, CA, USA
Sofia Englund, CA, USA
Paula Arantes Ferraz, Brazil
Gabriela Frías, GA, USA
Audrey Gatins, GA, USA
Viviana Gazel, Costa Rica
Amanda Hawila, UK
Elena Hawila, UK
Dia Haykal, Lebanon
Davar Irvani, GA, USA
Alishba Kassim, NY, USA
Adam Klopp, DC, USA
Christopher Kobes, VA, USA
Chelsea Kolff, NY, USA
José López-Sánchez, DC, USA
Cameron McLain, CA, USA
Sophie Morrison, NY, USA
Lily Rubino, NY, USA
Shukri Shammas, UK
Joshua Stroman, MA, USA
Jonathon Taee, NY, USA
Alex Ward, UK
Johnny Winn, UK
Lucien Zeigler, VA, USA

EARTH University Leadership Team

Jose Zaglul, President
Daniel Sherrard, Provost
Gerardo Mirabelli, Vice President of Development
Edgar Alvarado, Dean
Patricia Loria, Finance

eva

I am looking forward to bringing back my own knowledge to Mozambique, where my people are facing an economic crisis. When I graduate and start my own business that creates job opportunities in sustainable agriculture, I will have created another ripple of positive change in the world. It is all thanks to the generosity of donors that I am realizing my dreams at EARTH University. Their encouragment and investment in me have changed my life, and I too have learned how to change the lives of others.
Eva Mulandesa (‘17, Mozambique)